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Gargoyles of the Notre Dame

Written by: Europeish Editors | (0) comments

Centuries ago, architects added gargoyles to most of their large buildings. These carved stone grotesques most often had a spout, designed to convey water from the roof and the side of the building. This prevented rainwater from running down (and eroding) the walls.

A simple spout would have been more than sufficient, but that would not have been fun for the architects at all. Most of the gargoyles and ornaments they designed were unique, and not only protected the buildings from water, but also from any evil or harmful spirits.

If there’s one building known for the excessive use of gargoyles, it must be the Notre Dame of Paris. Over 5,000 gargoyles, chimeras and other sculptures guard the walls of the immense gothic church. Most of them have been doing this for centuries and are awarded for this with a stunning view over the French capital.

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Category: Buildings | France

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